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Writing Skills for Law Enforcement: Sentences, Essays, and Presentations, 1st Edition

By Carol Doughty
Instructional Resources
Digital teaching aids may be available for this title. All instructor requests are reviewed by our team before the files are made accessible.
Soft Cover
336 pages
ISBN-10: 0176414878
ISBN-13: 9780176414870
Publisher: Top Hat
Edition: 1st

Writing Skills for Law Enforcement: Sentences, Essays, and Presentations equips students with the tools needed to succeed inside the classroom and on the job. Students begin with the fundamentals of solid writing: grammar, sentence-level basics, and paragraph construction. The book provides readers with step-by-step processes for essay writing and conducting presentations while making them active participants through various exercises and collaborative activities. Numerous sample articles and essays - written by both students and police officers - support the learning experience and make the book relevant to anyone involved in law enforcement.

Features

  • Convenient: Workbook style format allows students to take notes and complete exercises in the book.
  • Relevant: Examples and exercises relate to the Police Foundations Program.
  • Improves communication: A variety of activities involve listening and presentation skills.
  • Inspires teamwork: Many exercises require collaboration.
  • Writing models: Writing selections are by Police Foundations students and from related publications.
  • Website at www.doughty.nelson.com provides a wealth of additional learning materials.

Table of Contents

  • Chapter 1: Spelling, Grammar, and Punctuation.
  • Learning Objectives and Learning Benefits
  • Spelling
  • Commonly Misspelled Words
  • Commonly Misused Words
  • Spelling Reference List
  • Grammar
  • Common Grammatical Errors
  • Parallelism
  • Punctuation
  • Rules to Remember
  • Summary
  • Chapter 2: Sentence Structure
  • Learning Objectives and Learning Benefits
  • Subjects and Predicates
  • Fragments
  • Types of Sentences
  • Sentence Order
  • Compound Sentences
  • Complex Sentences
  • Dependant Clauses
  • Run-on-Sentences
  • Comma Splices
  • Summary
  • Chapter 3: The Paragraph
  • Learning Objectives and Learning Benefits
  • Elements of the Paragraph
  • Sample Paragraph
  • The Introductory Sentence
  • The Body Sentences
  • The Concluding Sentence
  • The Outline
  • Linking Paragraphs
  • Summary
  • Chapter 4: Elements of the Essay
  • Learning Objectives and Learning Benefits
  • What Is an Essay?
  • The Thesis Statement
  • The Importance of the Thesis Statement
  • Other Parts of the Essay
  • Summary
  • Chapter 5: The Five-Paragraph Essay Model
  • Learning Objectives and Learning Benefits
  • The Five-Paragraph Essay
  • Length of Paragraphs
  • Paragraph 1: The Introduction
  • What to Include
  • Paragraphs 2, 3, and 4: The Body
  • The Parts of the Body
  • Paragraph 5: The Conclusion
  • Transition
  • Thesis Restatement
  • Link Back to the Introduction
  • A Definite Conclusion
  • Outline for a Five-Paragraph Essay
  • Example of a Completed Outline
  • Audience and Tone
  • Identifying Your Audience
  • Starting to Write
  • Samples of Five-Paragraph Essays
  • Summary
  • Chapter 6: The Process Essay
  • Learning Objectives and Learning Benefits
  • The Process Essay
  • Early Stages of Writing the Process Essay
  • Final Stages of Writing the Process Essay
  • Sample Process Essays
  • Summary
  • Chapter 7: The Research Essay Part 1: Getting Started
  • Learning Objectives and Learning Benefits
  • The Research Essay
  • Referencing: MLA Style
  • Review of the Five-Paragraph Style
  • What is Meant by "Research"?
  • Sample Research Essays
  • Starting the Essay
  • Step 1: Choosing a Topic
  • Step 2: Composing a Preliminary Bibliography (List of Works Cited)
  • Summary
  • Chapter 8: The Research Essay Part 2: Summarizing, Quoting, and Note Taking
  • Step 3a in the Research Essay Process: Summarizing
  • Why Do I Need to Learn How to Summarize?
  • Steps in Writing a Summary
  • Summary of Summarizing
  • Step 3b in the Research Essay Process: Taking Notes from Written Sources and Using Direct Quotations to Avoid Plagiarism
  • Short Quotations
  • Quoting in Succession
  • Plagiarism
  • Long Quotations
  • Quotations within Quotations
  • Summary of How to Use Direct Quotations in Essays
  • Step 3c in the Research Essay Process: Taking Notes from Videos
  • First Viewing
  • Second Viewing
  • Summary of How to Take Notes from Videos
  • Chapter 9: The Research Essay Part 3: Putting it All Together
  • Learning Objectives and Learning Benefits
  • Reviw
  • Step 4: Examining Your Notes to Find Three Points to Include in a Thesis Statement
  • Step 5: Writing the Preliminary Thesis Statement
  • Step 6: Making More Notes from Other Research Material
  • Step 7: Writing the Second Thesis Statement
  • Step 8: Finalizing the Thesis Statement
  • Step 9: Getting the Thesis Statement Approved by the Teacher
  • Step 10:Sorting Through and Throwing Out Some of the Research
  • Step 11: Cutting and Pasting
  • Step 12: Prioritizing and Supporting Details
  • Step 13: Composing the Outline
  • Step 14: Writing the First Draft
  • Step 15: Proofreading the First Draft
  • Step 16: Writing the Second Draft
  • Step 17: Writing the List of Works Cited
  • Step 18: Allowing Time to Elapse
  • Step 19: Proofreading the Second Draft
  • Step 20: Writing the Final Copy
  • Step 21: Preparing the Essay to Meet Submission Requirements
  • Checklist: Steps in Writing a Research Essay
  • Summary
  • Chapter 10: The Comparison/Contrast Essay
  • Learning Objectives and Learning Benefits
  • Definition of the Comparison/Contrast Essay
  • Sample Comparison/Contrast Essay: Informal
  • Sample Comparison/Contrast Essay: Research
  • Summary
  • Chapter 11: The Oral Presentation
  • Learning Objectives and Learning Benefits
  • Preparing the Oral Presentation
  • Speeches versus Presentations
  • Choosing a Topic
  • Gathering Information
  • The Outline
  • Knowing Your Audience
  • Assembling Your Presentation
  • Delivery Techniques
  • Adding a Personal Touch
  • Using Notes Effectively
  • Nonverbal Communication Skills
  • Using Audio-Visual Aids
  • Involving Your Audience
  • Final Preparations
  • How to Relieve Stress Prior to Your Presentation
  • Quick Checklist for Oral Presentations
  • Summary
  • Appendices:
  • A. Resource and Note Taking Pages
  • B. MLA Documentation Style
  • C. Sample Memo, Police Narrative Report, and Business Letter
  • D. Student''s Personal Spelling List
  • E. Sample Research Essays
  • F. Answer Key
  • Works Cited
  • Copyright Acknowledgements
  • Index

Author Information

Françoise Baylis

Françoise Baylis, Professor and Canada Research Chair in Bioethics and Philosophy at Dalhousie University, is one of Canada's public intellectuals. She is a frequent guest on CB...